2016 Northwest Conference on Childhood Grief Program

 

 

February 5th and 6th, 2016

Swedish Cherry Hill

500 17th Ave

Seattle, WA 98122

 

 REGISTER HERE

 

 

 

Table of Contents

Conference Details…………………………………………………………………………….3

Location Information…………………………………………………………………………3

Directions…………………………………………………………………………………………..3

Continuing Education…………………………………………………………………………4

Cancellation Policy……………………………………………………………………………..6

Conference Schedule: At A Glance……………………………………………………..6

Conference Program Sessions and Presenter Details……………………….11

Friday, February 5th – Day 1 – Keynote & Options for sessions 1-4…..11

Saturday, February 6th – Day 2 Keynote & Options for Sessions 5-6….29

Closing Plenary………………………………………………………………………………….37

Conference Sponsors and Partners……………………………………………………39

 


 

 

Conference Details

Location Information

Swedish Cherry Hill

500 17th Ave.

Seattle, WA 98122

Directions

From the South

Take I-5 northbound to the James Street Exit (164). Turn right (east) on James Street. James will become Cherry Street, see below

From the North

Take I-5 southbound to the James Street Exit (165A). Turn left (east) on James Street. James will become Cherry Street, see below

Continuing from Cherry Street

For short-term parking: Turn right (south) on 18th Avenue. Turn right (west) on Jefferson. Turn right (south) into the main hospital entrance.

For long term parking:  Turn right on 16th Avenue, then right into the hospital garage. Walk over the skybridge to the hospital.

Parking is not included in conference registration and can be up to $16.00 per day.

Continuing Education

Continuing education credit for this event is co-sponsored by Safe Crossings Foundation and   The Institute for Continuing Education.   The program offers 7.50 contact hours for Day 1; and 4.50 contact hours for Day 2.   Credit is awarded on a session-by-session basis, with full attendance required for the sessions attended.    Application forms will be available on site along with a session evaluation packet.  You will turn in the package at the end of the conference.  If you have questions regarding continuing education, please contact The Institute at: 251-990-5030, email: instconted@aol.com   

 Psychology:  The Institute for Continuing Education is an organization approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Counseling:   The Institute for Continuing Education and Safe Crossings Foundation are co-sponsors of this event.  This co-sponsorship has been approved by NBCC.  The Institute for Continuing Education is an NBCC approved continuing education provider, 5643.  The Institute for Continuing Education is solely responsible for this program, including the awarding of NBCC credit.

Social Work:  The Institute for Continuing Education is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program.  The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for the program.   ASWB Provider No. 1007.     Licensed social workers should contact their individual state jurisdiction to review current continuing education requirements for license renewal.

Illinois Dept. Professional Regulation Provider No. 159-000606.

Ohio Counselor and Social Work Provider No. RCS 030001.

Florida Dept. Health, Div. SW, MFT, Counseling Provider BAP 255, expiration 03/17.

Marriage-Family Therapy: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the Ohio Board MFT, Provider RTX 100501;  Texas Board  MFT, Provider 177; Florida Department Health, Division MFT, Counseling, Social Work, Provider BAP 255, expiration 03/2017.

 Drug-Alcohol:    The Institute for Continuing Education is approved by the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) to provide continuing education for alcohol and drug abuse counselors.  NAADAC Provider No. 00243.

 Nursing:   The Institute for Continuing Education is an approved provider of continuing education in nursing by the California Board of Nursing, Provider CEP 12646.  Nurses are responsible for checking with their state board to determine if credit issued through an approved provider of the CA Board of Nursing is honored by their state board.

Skills Level:  Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this event, sessions have not been ranked for skill level.  Participants are urged to review the session descriptions for appropriateness for professional and personal needs.

Please bring your professional license information because it is required when you turn in the forms at the end of the conference. Don’t forget to turn in your CEU packet at the end of the conference.  There will be a box available after the closing plenary. If you forget and have to send it in yourself you will be charged a $25 processing fee.

ADA Statement:

If you have special needs, please contact marci@safecrossingsfoundation.org, 206-652-4723.

 

 

 

Cancellation Policy:

Refunds will be provided for registrations cancelled in writing and received by January 1, 2016. A cancellation penalty of $75 will apply. People substitutions can be made at any time, but will require advance written notice by January 1, 2016.

 

Conference Schedule: At A Glance

Click on the highlighted words below to see the details for that section of the conference or scroll down for the full program.

Conference Schedule – Friday February 5, 2016
Time Event Session Room
8-8:50 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast (provided) East Tower Foyer – Pinard Auditorium
9-10:20 AM Keynote Day 1 – Donna Schuurman East Tower  – Pinard Auditorium
10:30 – 11:50 AM Session #1 James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC)
McNiel Current research on childhood bereavement and support SECC room B
Hecht Bringing storytelling, poetry and creative writing and drama to groups of children and teens facing loss SECC room C
McCormick Building a grief support group for kids from the ground up SECC room A
Verneuil/Stillger Supporting children facing loss through creative expression and DRAW IT OUT (Part 1) SECC room D
12 – 12:50 PM Lunch (provided) James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC) Foyer
1 – 2:20 PM Session #2 James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC)
Neal Family support for anticipatory loss SECC room A
Kabour/Love Grief responses following a traumatic loss SECC room B
Goldsmith Concrete tools for supporting grieving kids in the  classroom SECC room C
Verneuil/Stillger Supporting children facing loss through creative expression and DRAW IT OUT (Part 2) SECC room D
2:30 -3:50 PM Session #3 James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC)
Musson/Baker Grieving and growing together: the effectiveness of art therapy with bereaved families SECC room A
Duke Teen Groups: What has worked to sustain and grow SECC room B
Fleming Self-compassion & mindfulness SECC room C
4:00- 5:20PM Session #4 James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC)
Arguez/Gordon Poetry and guided journaling as a therapeutic intervention SECC room D
Linnehan Beyond Words: The restorative power of the arts in helping children and families heal after suicide loss SECC room A
Meyers Therapeutic drama techniques supporting children and teens throughout their grief process SECC room C
Barrett The Parent’s Dilemma – How to creatively engage children in the funeral SECC room B
5:30-6:30 PM Networking Reception (drinks and appetizers provided) James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC) Foyer
Conference Schedule – Saturday February 6, 2016
Time Event Session Room
8-8:30 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast (provided) East Tower – Pinard Auditorium Foyer
9-10:20 AM Keynote Day 2 – Schuurman Panel East Tower  – Pinard Auditorium
10:30 – 11:50 AM Session #5
Eastgard Suicide loss and prevention SECC room B
Lim Skills & tools to improve grief & bereavement practice – focus on self-reflection SECC room C
Allen Creative interventions for children’s anticipatory grief  (Part 1) SECC room A
12 – 12:50 PM Lunch (provided) James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC) foyer
1 – 2:20 PM Session #6 James Tower – Education and Conference Center (SECC)
Allen Creative interventions for children’s anticipatory grief (Part 2) SECC room A
Hillard A Psychotherapy-creative arts therapy approach to children’s grief camps SECC room C
McNiel How to help grieving kids in the classroom SECC room B
2:30 -3:50 PM Closing Plenary – Beverly/Ross – The Art of self-care East Tower – Pinard Auditorium
4:00 PM Close and Sign-out Sessions East Tower – Pinard Auditorium

Conference Program Sessions and Presenter Details

Friday, February 5th – Day 1

9:00 AM – 10:20 AM: Keynote – Donna Schuurman – Bereavement-informed responses to traumatic death

To help children, teens and families who have been impacted by trauma and death, we must understand their needs and have a solid theoretical foundation for effective response and treatment methodologies. This keynote will discuss key concepts and models related to grief and trauma, and how they inform our responses, as well as core elements from research and practice-based evidence.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Cite the origin and meaning of key concepts including the following: trauma, traumatic event, traumatic death, complicated (or traumatic) grief and implications for practice.
  2. Summarize theoretical models of response to families who have experienced traumatic loss.
  3. Identify the core needs of children, teens and families coping with the death of a friend or family member and how those needs may be influenced by the mode of death (sudden unexpected, prolonged illness, suicide, homicide).
  4. Appraise what core and key elements should be part of any program, service or outreach to families impacted by traumatic loss.

Biography:

Donna Schuurman, EdD, FT, is the Sr. Director of Advocacy & Training for The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, where she has served in various roles since 1986, including as E.D. for 24 years. She writes and trains internationally on family bereavement issues, and is a founding board member of The National Alliance for Grieving Children. She has trained the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Family Assistance Teams, and the FBI’s Rapid Deployment teams, as well as medical personnel, NGO staff and caregivers following major manmade and natural disasters including the Oklahoma City bombing, 9/11, Japan’s 1995 Kobe and 2011 earthquakes, and the Sandy Hook School shootings.

 

10:30 – 11:50 AM – Session 1 Options:

A. Andy McNiel: Current research on childhood bereavement support

The National Alliance for Grieving Children has conducted and continues to compile research findings on childhood bereavement. This project, led by Donna Gaffney, DNSc, PMHCNS-BC, FAAN and started in 2014, has compiled and summarized hundreds of scholarly papers into an annotated bibliography that will be made available to the public in the Summer of 2016. This presentation will provide highlights of some of the research findings and discuss their implications on children’s bereavement support practice. We will also explore the gaps in current research and share when and where to look for new research information currently being conducted.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to identify current research on issues related to childhood bereavement.
  2. Attendees will be able to apply current research findings to their own practices of bereavement support.
  3. Attendees will be able to search current literature to more easily discover current research findings related to childhood bereavement support.

Biography:

Andy McNiel, MA currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer for the National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC). In his role as CEO, Andy serves the childhood bereavement field as a national fundraiser, thought leader, and ambassador for issues related to childhood bereavement support, traveling extensively throughout the United States. Andy has served as a non-profit manager and leader throughout his career, and has provided support and counseling to bereaved children, teenagers, and adults in a variety of support settings. He is a nationally recognized presenter and trainer, using a balance of humor, teaching, and facilitating on a variety of topics related to strategic planning, non-profit leadership, childhood bereavement support, adult bereavement issues, and group facilitation. He holds a BA in Religion and MA in Counseling. He is a national trainer for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. For fun, he enjoys boating and spending time with his family and friends.

 

B.  Merna Ann Hecht: Bringing storytelling, poetry, creative writing and drama to groups of children and teens facing loss.

An experiential workshop in which participants will be guided through two traditional stories, one African, the other Native American, in order to consider how themes of loss and resilience, as they appear in stories, can be connected to follow-up creative literary arts activities through which young people can express both sorrow and hope. Specific ways in which storytelling, creative writing and drama can establish a safe space and ease trauma will be emphasized through hands on, participatory activities. An extensive annotated bibliography of stories and creative writing resources will be distributed.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn to draw on themes from traditional stories of diverse cultures that address the human life-cycle and offer a preparedness for the inevitability of loss, while also addressing universal aspects of hope and resilience following the death of loved ones.
  2. Consider the ways in which children grieve differently than adults and the needs of children for play, creativity and activities that nourish their imaginative capacities while they are grieving life-changing losses.
  3. Learn how specific creative drama and creative writing prompts and activities drawn directly from themes within a story can create a space and place for children and young adults to give voice and expression to their sorrow and tap into their own inner resources toward hope and healing.

Biography: 

Merna Ann Hecht is a teaching artist, poet, essayist, and storyteller, and founded and co-directs the Stories of Arrival Youth Voices Poetry Project with refugee and immigrant youth at Foster High School in Tukwila, WA, one of the most language diverse schools in the U.S. An award winning storyteller, she received a 2008 National Storytelling Network Applied Storytelling Award through which she worked at BRIDGES: A Center for Grieving Children in Tacoma, WA. Merna also teaches Creative Writing, Humanities and Social Justice Courses for the University of WA, Tacoma. She has been the writer in residence at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center School working with young people whose family members were facing a life threatening illness and with young cancer patients. Merna’s poems and essays appear in numerous journals and books. Based on her background of extensive work with youth facing trauma and loss she is in the process of completing a forthcoming book titled Companions for the Crossing: Stories & Poetry for Work with Children & Teens Dealing with Loss.

 

C. Jen McCormick: Building a grief support group for kids from the ground up: skills, tools and self-care

In this presentation, participants will have the opportunity to learn about contemporary grief theory and how it can be used in building a curriculum for children/teen grief support groups. Participants will walk away with concrete tools and a template on which to build their unique curriculum. The presenter will discuss group facilitation tactics including specific communication skills. In addition, participants will reflect on the impact of vicarious traumatization for group facilitators.

Learning objectives:

  1. To be able to identify two contemporary grief theories and their application to grief group curriculum.
  2. To understand the importance of communication skills for group facilitation as well as identify three main skills of communication in groups.
  3. To define and recognize the phenomenon of vicarious traumatization and apply two self-care techniques that can also be used in a group setting.

Biography:

Jen McCormick has served as the Clinical Director of The Healing Center since June of 2013. In her duties there, Jen has spoken to many groups on the topic of grief and children, including the Tulalip Tribes and the University of Washington Social Work Department. Jen also works as a facilitator of the Survivor of Suicide support group through the King County Crisis Clinic. Prior to this, Jen worked at Ele’s Place, a healing center for grieving children in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she supervised and trained volunteers as well as facilitated adult grief and loss groups. Jen also worked as a hospice social worker at Providence Hospice of Seattle.  While there she volunteered for Camp Erin. In addition to her clinical grief and loss experience, Jen has several years of experience in community mental health, emergency department social work, and inpatient psychiatry. She earned a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Washington in 2002, and completed a Certificate in Psychological Trauma from the University of Washington in 2013.

 

D. Lulu Verneuil and Nancy Stillger – Supporting children facing loss through creative expression and DRAW IT OUT (Part 1)

Learn how to use creative expression with kids facing grief and loss in your practice or program.   Using exercises from Draw It Out, an interactive workbook that uses creative self-expression to help children (ages 6+) cope with loss and the grief that accompanies it. Developed by a team of experts based on relevant areas of research and best practices, the workbook acts as a catalyst to healthy emotional expression for children. Through age appropriate prompts that serve as an outlet for inner pain and a springboard to healing conversations, children learn how to put their grief on paper and learn life skills that build upon their ability to face future challenges.

Learning objectives:

  1. To be introduced to best practices of working with creativity and grief through hands-on art activities.
  2. To enable participants to learn how to use the Draw It Out workbook in different settings and situations. Learn how it can be used to help a child honor the loss, identify support systems, express feelings, tell their story and more.
  3. To learn how the Draw It Out workbook can be used programmatically in conjunction with the Leader’s Companion that provides experiential art activities and closing questions to deepen children’s learning.

Biographies:

Lulu Verneuil has been a clinical social worker for 15 years. After working for 6 years at Seattle Children’s Hospital Intensive Care Unit with critically ill children, she transitioned into providing grief support and education to children and teens in the Seattle area through Providence Hospice of Seattle’s program. Lulu spent many years providing anticipatory grief & bereavement support to children & families in one-on-one and group settings and was the clinical lead for the teen Camp Erin in King County.

 

Nancy Stillger, MA is Program Manager at Art with Heart. Nancy is responsible for the overall functioning and delivery of quality programming, trainings, workshops, and activities to youth and community partners in order to further Art with Heart’s mission of helping children overcome trauma through creative expression. Nancy holds a BA in Economics from Scripps College and a MA in Urban Planning from the University of California at Los Angeles. Nancy was a recipient of an Arts Administration Fellowship with the National Endowment for the Arts. She has over twenty years of experience in non-profit administration. She believes strongly that art can transform lives.

 

1:00 – 2:20 PM Session 2 Options:

A. Heather Neal: Family support for anticipatory loss – 20 years of reflection

Providing anticipatory loss groups for families experiencing serious illness can be both challenging and rewarding. This session will address the realities of providing family support in the midst of a serious diagnosis and help you consider some of the factors affecting long-term success of anticipatory support groups.

Learning objectives

  1. Identify 3 needs of children who have someone in their family with a serious diagnosis.
  2. Identify 3 details to consider when creating family support groups for anticipatory loss.
  3. Learn 2 easy activities that can be used as tools to create discussion in anticipatory loss groups.

 

Biography:

Heather Neal, LICSW, CT began her time at BRIDGES:  A Center for Grieving Children as a 2nd Year MSW student intern in 2002.   She graduated from UW/Tacoma with her MSW in 2004. In 2005, she became certified in Thanatology through ADEC (Association for Death Education and Counseling). After graduation, she worked for Senior Information and Assistance for Senior Services of King County for 2 years before joining the BRIDGES staff as the Family Support Coordinator in June 2006. She has experience working with professional caregivers, volunteers, and families, coordinating both groups and camp and grant stewardship. Her work includes support to families as they navigate serious illness in addition to after a death has occurred. She is currently the supervisor of BRIDGES: A Center for Grieving Children, a program of Mary Bridge Hospital and Health Center in Tacoma, WA.

 

B. Marianne Kabour and Jacquelyn Love: Grief responses following a traumatic loss

Experiencing a traumatic loss can alter the way a child or teen navigates the grieving process and can develop into childhood traumatic grief (Cohen, Mannarino, & Knudson, 2004). Due to the nature of the loss, these children and teens may not have had the opportunity to prepare for the loss or say goodbye and can feel more intense emotions such as shock, anger, guilt and fear; even happy memories can become trauma reminders. Symptoms can include re-experiencing, avoidance, hyperarousal, yearning for the deceased and difficulty accepting the death (Brown, Pearlman & Goodman, 2004). Exhibiting symptoms similar to PTSD, these children and teens can benefit from treatment that allows for the processing of the traumatic event while coping with their loss (Mannarino & Cohen, 2011). This presentation will include a discussion of responses to traumatic loss and interventions that can be used to help these children and teens begin the process of healing. Experiential activities will be included for participants as well.

 

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn traumatic grief responses by developmental level.
  2. Participants will be able to speak on the importance of incorporating trauma interventions with grief therapy.
  3. Participants will come away with ideas to use when working with children/teens who have experienced traumatic loss.

Biographies:

Marianne Kabour is a licensed clinical psychologist trained in pediatric psychology whose work focuses on assisting children/teens and families cope with serious/chronic medical conditions, recover from medically related traumatic or witnessed events, and heal from loss.  Her clinical interests include teaching skills on coping and adjustment, increasing adherence, grief/loss, and promoting resiliency. Dr. Kabour joined the team at Transitions Professional Center, in Portland OR, in November 2014 to add a child component to the group. She completed her doctorate at the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and prior to moving to the beautiful northwest was working at Dayton Children’s Hospital in Ohio covering the areas of hematology/oncology, gastroenterology, trauma and consultation/liaison.

 

Jacquelyn Love is a licensed clinical psychologist and serves as the Children’s Bereavement Counselor for Providence Hospice in Portland,  OR. In this capacity, she is the Clinical Coordinator for Me, Too family grief program and Camp Erin Portland, OR. She provides training and education for medical personnel, staff, and volunteers with Providence Hospice on topics of grief and anticipatory grief. Previously, Dr. Love was the Program Director at Brooke’s Place for Grieving Young People, in Indianapolis, IN where she also designed and implemented a program evaluation. As a mental health clinician, she has experience and training with families receiving support in a variety of mental health service settings (e.g. schools, residential treatment centers, day treatment, outpatient) and a pediatric hospital. She completed her Psy.D. at the University of Indianapolis.

 

C. Beverly Goldsmith, MSW: Concrete Tools for Supporting Grieving Children in the School Setting: A Guide for School Teachers, Counselors and Staff

This presentation will outline practical guidelines which School and Counseling Professionals can use to best insure that a grieving child is appropriately supported at school, and that school performance can be optimized during bereavement.

By increasing your own understanding of how children experience grief and loss, school staff can establish better communication with families concerning the individualized needs of their grieving children.  A student can, thus, be empowered with a sense of control through appropriate choices within the school setting.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain an increased understanding of children’s grief responses and how they manifest in a child’s behavior within the school setting.
  2. Participants will learn to develop strategies which are individualized in an effort to empower a grieving student with appropriate choices.
  3. Participants will receive concrete, practical guidelines to increase collaborative efforts between schools and families who are supporting grieving children.

Biography:

Beverly Goldsmith is the current Coordinator of the Safe Crossings Children’s Grief Support Program of Providence Hospice of Seattle.  Beverly received her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of South Carolina in 1982.  Prior to receiving her Master’s degree, she worked extensively with children in a variety of medical, social service and school settings. Upon graduation, she became the Director of a Hospice Program in Greenwood, S.C., which encompassed clinical intervention with patients and their families, volunteer training and management, and the creation of cooperative relationships with local public and private nursing resources for the provision of hospice care in a six county area.

 

Beverly became the Director of Social Work for the Upper Savannah Health District in 1983, then moved to the Seattle, WA area in 1984, where she became a Medical Social Worker for Providence Hospice of Seattle. Beverly provided clinical case management and support to hospice patients and their families, as well as fulfilling several team leadership roles. In 2002, Beverly participated in “Parish Connections”, a one year grant, in which she offered end of life and bereavement education and support to a number of parishes in the Archdiocese of Seattle. Since this time, Beverly has provided consultation services, as well as in-service and bereavement group opportunities to Catholic parishes through the Consoling Grace program.

 

During 2002, Beverly made the decision to focus her primary professional career toward children and their families by joining Safe Crossings, the Children’s Grief Support Program of Providence Hospice of Seattle.  She has since assisted with the development of a rapidly growing program over the last 13 years, as well as fostering an increasingly collaborative effort with other existing children’s grief programs in the King County, WA community. Beverly has been increasingly involved in providing education for Health Care and School Professionals concerning the needs of grieving children and their families, presenting at local, state and national conferences. Beverly currently provides clinical supervision and guidance to three Safe Crossings counselors, the coordinator of Camp Erin, (the weekend children’s bereavement camp for kids and teens in King County,) and an administrative assistant.

 

D. Lulu Verneuil and Nancy Stillger – Supporting children facing loss through creative expression and DRAW IT OUT (Part 2)

Learn how to use creative expression with kids facing grief and loss in your practice or program.   Using exercises from Draw It Out, an interactive workbook that uses creative self-expression to help children (ages 6+) cope with loss and the grief that accompanies it. Developed by a team of experts based on several relevant areas of research and best practice, the workbook acts as a catalyst to healthy emotional expression for children. Through age appropriate prompts that serve as an outlet for inner pain and a springboard to healing conversations, children learn how to put their grief on paper and will learn life skills that will build upon their ability to face future challenges.

Learning objectives:

  1. To be introduced to best practices of working with creativity and grief through hands-on art activities.
  2. To enable participants to learn how to use the Draw It Out workbook in different settings and situations. Learn how it can be used to help a child honor the loss, identify support systems, express feelings, tell their story and more.
  3. To learn how the Draw It Out workbook can be used programmatically in conjunction with a Leader’s Companion that provides experiential art activities and closing questions to deepen children’s learning.

Biographies:

Lulu Verneuil has been a clinical social worker for 15 years. After working for 6 years at Seattle Children’s Hospital Intensive Care Unit with critically ill children, she transitioned into providing grief support and education to children and teens in the Seattle area through Providence Hospice Seattle’s program. Lulu spent many years providing anticipatory grief & bereavement support to children & families in one-on-one and group settings and was the clinical lead for the teen Camp Erin in King County.

 

Nancy Stillger, MA is Program Manager at Art with Heart. Nancy is responsible for the overall functioning and delivery of quality programming, trainings, workshops, and activities to youth and community partners in order to further Art with Heart’s mission of helping children overcome trauma through creative expression. Nancy holds a BA in Economics from Scripps College and a MA in Urban Planning from the University of California at Los Angeles. Nancy was a recipient of an Arts Administration Fellowship with the National Endowment for the Arts. She has over twenty years of experience in non-profit administration. She believes strongly that art can transform lives.

 

2:30- 3:50 PM Session 3 Options:

A. Madison Musson and Dani Baker-Cole: Grieving and growing together: the use of art therapy with bereaved families.

The use of art as a therapeutic tool in addressing the needs of grieving children has been noted as a valuable resource for supporting coping and emotional expression. This presentation will expand upon the existing application of art as a therapeutic tool for addressing the needs of grieving families through the incorporation of the Expressive Therapies Continuum and art therapy as a modality. Current loss and grief research will be interwoven with developmentally and culturally-relevant considerations to provide an expanded holistic framework for professionals working systemically to support bereaved families.

The focus of this presentation, supporting grieving families through the use of art therapy techniques, was created as part of Madison’s Master’s degree project to help provide developmentally appropriate, culturally considerate creative interventions for grieving children, adolescents, and families.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will gain increased understanding about the use of art therapy interventions with bereaved children, adolescents, and families.
  2. Participants will learn developmental and cultural considerations for supporting with grieving families.
  3. Participants will be learn 3 ways to incorporate creative experientials into grief and loss work.

Biographies:

Madison (Madi) Musson is a Master’s degree candidate in the Masters of Psychology: Couples & Family Therapy and Art Therapy program at Antioch University Seattle. She has volunteered as a family art therapist intern with many organizations supporting grieving families in Washington, including BRIDGES: A Center for Grieving Children, Providence Hospice of Seattle, Safe Crossings Family Day Camps, The Healing Center, and Camp Erin. Madi also has worked as an individual & family art therapist intern at Southwest Youth and Family Services, and internationally with Tibetan and Indian families to address losses associated with social injustice and oppression.

 

Dani Baker-Cole is a teaching faculty member at Antioch University Seattle. She received her MA in Psychology: Couples & Family Therapy and Art Therapy at Antioch University Seattle in 2006. Dani has over ten years of experience working with grieving families in a variety of settings, including her recent work providing Individual, Couple, and Family Psychotherapy as well as Art Therapy at Creative Healing Seattle, LLC. Currently Dani also teaches courses in the Art Therapy and Clinical Psychology programs at Antioch University Seattle.

 

B. Lisa Duke: Teen groups-what has worked to sustain and grow

We will explore the viable teen support groups at BRIDGES; specifically, what has worked, what we have learned from what hasn’t worked; and ideas on how to keep them thriving.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand how groups can successfully support teens in their grief.
  2. Participants will explore experiential tools that have been successful and leave the session with practical ideas to use in their own groups.
  3. Participants will explore ways to adapt their groups to the needs of the group members whether it is developmental, level of trauma, engaged vs disengaged members.

Biography: 

Lisa Duke, LICSW-A, joined the BRIDGES staff as the Family Support Coordinator in May, 2012. Before coming to BRIDGES, Lisa ran a home business, supervised a local soup kitchen and focused on raising her two daughters.  Prior to becoming a parent, Lisa worked for 9 years in New York City providing clinical services to children and their families in a South Bronx child mental health clinic.  She received her MSW degree from New York University.  Before moving to NYC, Lisa worked for 5 years with New Horizon Ministries in Seattle, coordinating the program and volunteers who worked with teen girls living or working on the streets.

 

C. Jane Fleming: Is Compassion Fatigue Draining Your Spirit?

In our time together, we will review the effects of compassion fatigue – its causes and potential symptoms. With awareness (and respect) for this very real condition which can cause ambivalence and burn-out in professionals, we will dedicate the majority of the session to the art of self-compassion and mindfulness, as tools and a means to self-care, improved interpersonal relationships and personal well-being. The goal is to continue to serve our clients while also serving ourselves with compassion.

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn the basic causes and effects of compassion fatigue.
  2. Learn the theory of self-compassion and how it can be a tool to support professionals in working with clients.
  3. Experience and practice the loving kindness mindfulness meditation which can be supportive in stress reduction, interpersonal relationships and overall well-being.

Biography: 

Jane Fleming is a spiritual director, hospice grief counselor and artist, with over twenty years of experience supporting those in search of meaning. She draws nourishment from a contemplative practice, utilizes the creative process to open hidden knowledge, and incorporates ritual in daily life. Jane is an experienced group and retreat facilitator.

 

4:00 – 5:20 PM Session 4 Options:

A. Julie Arguez and Karen Gordon: Poetry and Guided Journaling as a therapeutic intervention for pediatric palliative care patients, their caregivers, and staff members.

Poetry has an extraordinary ability to quiet the world around us and allow us to focus on the present and pay attention to our internal experience.  Paired with the opportunity for self-reflection and expressive writing, poems can be a way to quickly tap into the undercurrents of emotions at a given time.  The use of poetry and guided journaling gives participants a window into their own personal resiliency.  This presentation will describe the ways the team at Seattle Children’s has employed poetry and journaling for pediatric palliative care patients, their caregivers and staff members.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review research on the use of poetry as a psychosocial intervention.
  2. Describe the development of poetry writing intervention for patients and their caregivers.
  3. Present examples of the poems and art projects that have been created as a result of project.

Biographies:

Julie Arguez has worked as a clinical social worker in death and dying for 10 years and with children and their families for the last 7 years.

 

Karen Gordon has over 12 years of clinical experience working with children, adolescents and families in the medical field. Her areas of focus have included Hematology/Oncology and death and dying.

 

We have provided presentations at the Annual Conference for the Association of Oncology Social Workers and the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Care Network.  We also serve in teaching roles for the fellows, residents, and interns who work at Seattle Children’s.

 

B. Christine Linnehan: Beyond Words: The restorative power of the arts in helping children and families heal after suicide loss

The suicide of a loved one can have a profound and devastating impact on those left behind. Suicide loss puts the bereaved of all ages at a higher risk for developing a combination of trauma and grief distress. Survivors of suicide loss often state that words alone cannot convey the depth of their experience. Children, especially, may not have the capacity to articulate their complex emotions and perceptions verbally.

In this interactive workshop, we will explore how the expressive arts –movement, music, art, poetry, and drama—can be integrated into an evidence-based treatment model designed for children and families after violent death. Participants will learn practical mind/body strategies to help the bereaved cope with the interplay of trauma and grief as well as restorative interventions that address the prominent themes and challenges that arise following suicide loss. Case examples and experiential activities will illustrate how the creative process can counteract the lethargy of grief; mobilize the imagination as a healing force; and serve as a voice when words are not enough.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe 4 ways that the distinctive nature of suicide impacts bereavement.
  2. Demonstrate at least 2 mind/body strategies for decreasing trauma reactions and building coping capacity in bereaved children and teens.
  3. Share an example of how expressive arts interventions can be used to help process narratives of traumatic loss.

Biography:

Christine Linnehan, M.S., LCPC, BC-DMT, FT has been in private practice at Riverview Counseling, in Scarborough, ME for the past 19 years and has been a clinical consultant in the Bereavement Support Program at the Center for Grieving Children since 2004. Previously, she worked in inpatient and partial hospitalization settings that focused on the treatment of trauma. She is a licensed Clinical Counselor, a Board-Certified Dance/Movement Therapist; and a Board-Certified Approved Clinical Supervisor. She is a trained Hospice volunteer and holds an advanced certification as a Fellow of Thanatology from the Association of Death Education and Counseling. In her clinical practice, Christine leads suicide loss support groups for adults based on the Restorative Retelling Model (RR) and uses Grief and Trauma Intervention (GTI), Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), and Creative Arts Therapies in her work with traumatically bereaved children and teens. She has a special interest in the impact of suicide loss on children and creative approaches to healing.

 

C. Jill Meyers: Therapeutic drama techniques supporting children and teens throughout their grief process

After providing an overview and sharing of basic Drama Therapy theory, this presentation will be an active, experiential workshop. The activities will address a range of developmental levels supporting application for both children and teens.  The activities will also specifically relate to grief processing of feelings; story-telling; companioning the client; empathy building; trust; and exploring healthy coping strategies from a strength-based perspective. Various modalities will be employed in order to help inform participants about the wide-ranging opportunities drama and theatre offer the healing process.  There will be time for Q/A throughout the experience.

Learning objectives:

  1. Introduce participants to a general overview of Drama Therapy Theory: Strength based ideology; anthropological focus.
  2. Identify concrete therapeutic tools to companion grieving youth through application of drama related techniques. By the end of workshop participants will have experienced dramatic application of expression of feelings; creative problem-solving/coping skills; companioning; collaboration; actively applying client’s strengths; empathy building.
  3. Ability to self-assess activities for direct application into clinical practice.
  4. Clinicians will receive handouts of activities with guidance supporting facilitation and use in clinical practice.

Biography:

Jill Meyers MA, CCLS has been working with The Safe Crossings program at Providence Hospice of Seattle supporting both children and teens in anticipatory end of life situations and bereavement for the past 5.5 years. Prior to working with Safe Crossings, Jill was a Child Life Specialist at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Francisco. While there, Jill supported children and families in Pediatric Oncology as well as in Pediatric Cardiology. In addition to her traditional Child Life responsibilities, Jill was also in charge of developing Creative Art Therapy programs for all pediatrics at UCSF Children’s Hospital. During her time at UCSF, Jill developed a collaborative program implementing the use of theatre and visual art as primary therapeutic tools within clinical practice. The collaboration included high schools, the deYoung museum and hospitalized teens. The project continues today at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Jill received her master’s degree at Antioch University, Seattle having designed her own degree in psychology with a drama therapy focus. Jill’s passion is bringing creative interventions to youth dealing with end of life, life-limiting illnesses and grief.

D. Char Barrett: The Parent’s Dilemma – How to creatively engage children in the funeral

Engagement and participation in memorial or funeral services give grieving children and families a source of strength and healing when dealing with loss through death. Discover how to encourage conversations around participation with parents and children, offering creative ways to engage children in the planning, preparation and participation of memorial or funeral services. Learn about the valuable service hospice staff or grief counselors and therapists can provide by introducing these creative and healing approaches to families. Explore how a child’s grief can be expressed through the creation or gathering of sacred objects, artful decoration of the casket and the memorial/funeral or vigil space.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Demonstrates how to encourage discussions with parents or guardians regarding a child’s involvement with funeral planning, preparations and participation.   Models potential conversations with children about their choice and / or decision to participate in funeral activities.
  2. Assesses whether a child’s participation in funeral service(s) is appropriate given the child’s age, emotional development, relationship to the deceased, family dynamics, and the nature of the death.
  3. Describes several examples of how children can participate in various funeral practices and rituals, resulting in multi-generational engagement, connection and support at a time of loss. Expresses the emotional essence, positive impact and benefits of participation in funeral planning and preparations for bereaved children and family.
  4. Explores the connection of death, engagement and our children’s need to physically connect to other children, friends, family members and the deceased person on their journey through grief.
  5. Describes how a child’s grief can be expressed through the creative process of creating and decorating meaningful mementos, the casket, the vigil space, and the gathering of sacred objects and the creation of rituals.

Biography:

Char Barrett, is a Licensed Funeral Director, Home Funeral Consultant, owner of A Sacred Moment Funeral Services and the first President of the National Home Funeral Alliance. Char volunteered for Camp Erin, bereavement camp for children for ten years, is a Washington End of Life Coalition board member, and is an advisory Board Member of Lake Washington Technical Institute’s Funeral Service program.

 

 

Saturday February 6 – Day 2

9:00 – 10:20 AM Keynote: Donna Schuurmann Community response to traumatic loss – panel

Sue Eastgard and Kaaren Andrews will share their unique perspectives on working among Seattle’s at-risk youth and share lessons learned on how community response can help or hinder productive processing of traumatic deaths. Moderator Donna Schuurman will introduce the topic and speakers, whose comments will be followed by audience participant’s questions, comments, and responses.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify principles and practices that assist in productive processing for youth and communities following traumatic losses from suicide and homicide.
  2. Describe community responses to traumatic losses that have further complicated productive processing, healing and growth.
  3. Examine how community response to traumatic loss in the Seattle area may be improved and what role you and your organization may play.

Biographies:

Donna Schuurman, EdD, FT, is the Sr. Director of Advocacy & Training for The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, where she has served in various roles since 1986, including as E.D. for 24 years. She writes and trains internationally on family bereavement issues, and is a founding board member of The National Alliance for Grieving Children. She has trained the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Family Assistance Teams, and the FBI’s Rapid Deployment teams, as well as medical personnel, NGO staff and caregivers following major manmade and natural disasters including the Oklahoma City bombing, 9/11, Japan’s 1995 Kobe and 2011 earthquakes, and the Sandy Hook School shootings.

 

Sue Eastgard is a nationally recognized expert in the field of suicide prevention. She has worked on mental health issues for over 30 years as a clinician, manager and director of crisis services and suicide prevention efforts. She is currently working as the Director of Training for Forefront, a suicide prevention education and research program based at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work.  Sue is also the Chair of the King County Suicide Prevention Coalition. Ms. Eastgard founded the Youth Suicide Prevention Program of Washington State in 1999 and served as its director until June 2011. Prior to that, she served as the Executive Director for the Seattle-King County Crisis Clinic for 3½ years.  She was the President of the American Association of Suicidology in 2002.  Sue holds a master’s degree in social work from the University of Washington. She is a Master Trainer of ASIST and SafeTALK, suicide first aid training programs.

 

Kaaren Andrews is the principal of Interagency Academy, a network of small, alternative schools in the Seattle Public School System, focusing on at-risk youth in partnership with organizations and agencies serving Seattle’s youth at high risk for homelessness, incarceration, drug abuse and other challenges. Between September, 2014 and the start of the 2015 school year, 11 of their students died from gun violence or suicide.

 

10:30 – 11:50 Session 5 Options:

A. Sue Eastgard: Responding to tragic loss – Managing the impact of a student suicide

Schools need to be prepared to help staff and students cope with sudden loss in the short term, and over time.  This workshop will describe the steps involved in managing a tragedy, such as an adolescent death by suicide, and enumerate activities that are helpful and those that are not.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the steps involved in managing the impact of a student suicide.
  2. Identify community resources that can support a school’s grief reactions over time.
  3. Understand how good postvention is suicide prevention.

Biography:        

Sue Eastgard is a nationally recognized expert in the field of suicide prevention.  She has worked on mental health issues for 30+ years as a clinician, manager and director of crisis services and suicide prevention efforts.  She is currently working as the Director of Training for Forefront, a suicide prevention education and research program based at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work.  Sue is also the Chair of the King County Suicide Prevention Coalition.   Ms. Eastgard founded the Youth Suicide Prevention Program of Washington State in 1999 and served as its director until June 2011. Prior to that, she served as the executive director for the Seattle-King County Crisis Clinic for 3½ years.  She was the President of the American Association of Suicidology in 2002.  Sue holds a masters degree in social work from the University of Washington. She is a Master Trainer of ASIST and SafeTALK, suicide first aid training programs.

 

B.  Angela Lim:  Skills & tools to improve grief & bereavement practice – focus on self-reflection

Research into clinical supervision reveals that the process of integration of theory into practice and development of critical thinking skills are paramount for social workers and other mental health professionals.   There are a variety of models to impart these skills, most of which require extensive experience, time and preparation for clinical supervisors and supervisees.    We all can benefit from identifying tools which can streamline this process and to increase accessibility within an institution, in practicum and community based settings or for individual and group supervision modalities.   This presentation will review the culture of supervision in a variety of practice settings, the skills needed to provide supervision and the skills to be imparted to a supervisee (Gray, 2009; Melton, 2005; Wiener, 2012).  There will be demonstration of supervisor skill building through a reflective process tool that guides supervisees and supervisors to integrate theory into practice (Lister, 2012). The process can be utilized in many supervisory settings, as well as in self-reflection.

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize the importance of developing critical thinking skills to improve social work and mental health practice.
  2. Understand the role of supervision processes to prevent compassion fatigue and increase professional satisfaction.
  3. Gain knowledge of a reflective process to use in supervision of students, new social workers and other mental health professionals, as well as in self-reflection.

Biography:

Angela Lim, LICSW, OSW-C Oncology Outpatient Social Worker, UW Medicine|Valley Medical Center Cancer Services and Approved Clinical Supervisor. She has 15 years’ experience as a social worker in oncology, hospice, palliative care and primary care.  She is a practicum instructor for the University Of Washington School Of Social Work.  With community colleagues, she has developed a clinical supervision practice guiding and mentoring healthcare social workers as they work towards full licensure.

 

C.  Jennifer Allen: Creative Interventions for Children’s anticipatory grief: a hands-on workshop (Part 1)

Play, art, and story are natural languages for children. Learn how to support children through the unique experience of anticipatory grief by developing your experiential “know-how” with this engaging workshop.  A power point overview of anticipatory grief issues with real case examples will be followed by hands-on experiential training that can be adapted to different ages and applied to individuals and groups.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify issues unique to children’s anticipatory grief.
  2. Utilize at least 3 experientials (play, art, story) that support children’s coping with anticipatory grief.
  3. Discern adaptations of experientials to meet developmental stages and group vs. individual client constellations.

Biography:

Jennifer Allen, MS, LMFT, ATR-BC is an art therapist, psychotherapist and author of Bone Knowing (coming soon: Cinnamon Roll Sunday – a bibliotherapy book for children experiencing anticipatory grief.)  She has used art for personal development for over thirty years and therapeutically for over twenty. Jennifer specializes in adult and childhood grief and anticipatory grief in her private practice and has presented on and published articles on these subjects over the past decade. Jennifer developed and facilitated a program for children experiencing anticipatory grief: Kids Count 2, and facilitated Good Grief for Kids and Candlelighter (families touched by childhood cancer) support groups at hospitals in her community. She has provided training for therapists, and hospice and hospital volunteers on using art to help children with grief. Currently, Jennifer provides art process and grief-tending workshops.

 

12:00 Noon- 1:00 Lunch

 

1:00- 2:20 PM Session 6 Options:

A. Jennifer Allen: Creative Interventions for Children’s anticipatory grief: a hands-on workshop (Part 2)

Play, art, and story are natural languages for children. Learn how to support bereaved children through their grief journey by developing your experiential “know-how” with this engaging workshop.  A power point overview of grief issues which also touches on traumatic grief with real case examples will be followed by hands-on experientials that can be adapted to different ages and applied to individuals and groups.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify issues unique to children’s anticipatory grief.
  2. Utilize at least 3 experientials (play, art, story) that support children’s coping with anticipatory grief.
  3. Discern adaptations of experientials to meet developmental stages and group vs. individual client constellations.

Biography:

Jennifer Allen, MS, LMFT, ATR-BC is an art therapist, psychotherapist and author of Bone Knowing (coming soon: Cinnamon Roll Sunday – a bibliotherapy book for children experiencing anticipatory grief.)  She has used art for personal development for over thirty years and therapeutically for over twenty. Jennifer specializes in adult and childhood grief and anticipatory grief in her private practice and has presented on and published articles on these subjects over the past decade. Jennifer developed and facilitated a program for children experiencing anticipatory grief: Kids Count 2, and facilitated Good Grief for Kids and Candlelighter (families touched by childhood cancer) support groups at hospitals in her community. She has provided training for therapists, and hospice and hospital volunteers on using art to help children with grief. Currently, Jennifer provides art process and grief-tending workshops.

 

B. Russell Hilliard: A Psychotherapy and creative arts therapy approach to grief camps

We have an opportunity to serve grieving children in profound ways during their experiences at grief camps. This presentation provides a model to achieve identified therapeutic objectives within a brief psychotherapy model. In addition to psychotherapy techniques, a variety of creative arts therapy interventions will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify clinical needs addressed within a children’s grief camp.
  2. Recognize the benefits of incorporating psychotherapy techniques in grief groups.
  3. Understand how a creative arts therapies curriculum supports therapeutic goals.

Biography: 

Russell Hilliard, PhD, LCSW, LCAT, MT-BC, CHRC is the Senior Vice President of Patient Experience and Staff Development at Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care based out of Chicago, IL and the Founder of the Centers for Music Therapy in End of Life Care. In his 22-year hospice career, he has created innovative end of life care programs, devised robust documentation procedures, and assured processes support the highest quality patient and family care. His research, advocacy, and consultation have resulted in the development of first-time music therapy programs in hospices throughout the nation, thereby creating many new music therapy positions. He is the author of the text, Hospice and Palliative Care Music Therapy: A Guide to Program Development and Clinical Care, and his research has been published in a wide variety of scholarly journals. He also wrote a chapter titled, Music and Grief Work with Children and Adolescents, in a book titled Creative Interventions with Traumatized Children, edited by Cathy A. Malchiodi as well as the chapter titled Songs of Faith in End of Life Care in a book titled Developments in Music Therapy Practice: Case Study Perspectives.  Dr. Hilliard has provided keynote addresses for healthcare conferences and is a frequent presenter at professional conferences world-wide.

 

C. Andy McNiel: How to help Grieving kids in the classroom

Children grieve in all settings. Coming from an education background myself, I have seen children struggling in school to participate, pay attention, and succeed due to things going on outside of the school walls. In this session we will explore how to talk about grief in the school setting without putting extra pressures and demands on teaching staff. We will look at ways to introduce grief into work they’re already doing. We will also find safe ways for a child and the teacher to discuss needs when a death has occurred. We will look at different age groups and how to best reach them where they are.  Kids need a neutral person to talk through their thoughts and feelings about the death. Why can’t that be at school?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discuss strategies on how to introduce grief into your classroom.
  2. Discuss strategies on how to support a particular child after a death has occurred.
  3. Age appropriate activities and subject matter you’re already talking about.

Biography:

Andy McNiel, MA currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer for the National Alliance for Grieving Children (NAGC). In his role as CEO, Andy serves the childhood bereavement field as a national fundraiser, thought leader, and ambassador for issues related to childhood bereavement support, traveling extensively throughout the United States. Andy has served as a non-profit manager and leader throughout his career, and has provided support and counseling to bereaved children, teenagers, and adults in a variety of support settings. He is a nationally recognized presenter and trainer, using a balance of humor, teaching, and facilitating on a variety of topics related to strategic planning, non-profit leadership, childhood bereavement support, adult bereavement issues, and group facilitation. He holds a BA in Religion and MA in Counseling. He is a national trainer for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. For fun, he enjoys boating and spending time with his family and friends.

 

2:30 PM- 3:50 PM Closing Plenary

Beverly Goldsmith and Ross Robinson: The art of Self-Care

As caregivers, we have a responsibility to ourselves and those we serve to be aware of the impact of the cumulative toll that naturally occurs when exposed to the suffering and trauma of others. Identifying what sustains us in our work is a necessary strategy. The ideology of the term “self–care” can often feel daunting, and thus, not as accessible as it simply should be!  This presentation will offer creative alternatives to the traditional definition surrounding this phenomenon.  It is designed to break down barriers and to honor the daily helpful practices of human beings. The wisdom of many mentors throughout the world will be explored and you will be introduced to a tool, involving five key “Elements” which define self-care as “Individual”, “Integral”, “Intentional”, “Identifiable”, and “Integrated”.

Learning objectives:

  1. Increase awareness of the responsibility of caregivers to care for themselves
  2. Increase ability of caregivers to identify simple self-care techniques
  3. Create a strategy which incorporates the tool involving 5 key elements in the “evolution” of Self Care

Biographies:

Ross Robinson, MA, CC, CT received his Master’s degree in Theology from Seattle University in 2003. He has worked as a chaplain and currently works as a spiritual director in private practice as well as being a grief counselor for Providence Hospice of Seattle. Ross facilitates a cancer support group at the Swedish Cancer Institute. He works with children and adults in anticipatory and bereavement capacities, leads support groups on grief and loss and regularly facilitates self-care awareness with staff. Ross has worked with hospice for 18 years. His focus is for all patients and their families to find a way through loss toward reconciliation and greater ease of living.

 

Beverly Goldsmith, MSW, LICSW is the current Coordinator of the Safe Crossings Children’s Grief Support Program of Providence Hospice of Seattle.  Beverly received her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of South Carolina in 1982.

During 2002, Beverly made the decision to focus her primary professional career toward children and their families by joining Safe Crossings, the Children’s Grief Support Program of Providence Hospice of Seattle.  She has since assisted with the development of a rapidly growing program over the last 13 years, as well as fostering an increasing collaborative effort with other existing children’s grief programs in the King County, WA community. Beverly has been increasingly involved in providing education for Health Care and School Professionals concerning the needs of grieving children and their families, presenting at Local, State and National Conferences. .Beverly currently provides clinical supervision and guidance to three Safe Crossings counselors, the coordinator of Camp Erin, the weekend children’s bereavement camp for kids and teens in King County, and an administrative assistant.

 

 

Conference Sponsors

Nancy and Rod Hochman

SponsorNintendo